Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver: Mini Analysis 1

“When the rainy season fell on us in Kilanga, it fell like a plague. We were warned to expect rain in October, but at the close of July— surprising no one in Kilanga but ourselves—the serene heavens above began to dump buckets. Stekcub pmud! It rained pitchforks, as Mother says. It rained cats and dogs frogs bogs then it rained snakes and lizards. A pestilence of rain we received, the likes of which we had never seen or dreamed about in Georgia.” Adah Price (Kingsolver 58)
Kingsolver uses a profusion of metaphors to create imagery throughout the Poisonwood Bible. In order to describe and appeal the reader to their five senses, she uses imagery to make comparisons and help the reader imagine the situation in their minds. In this passage Adah Price is describing the rainy season in the Congo. “When the rainy season came in Kilanga, it fell like a plague”, this represent the immense amount of water that fell where the Price family was living. By comparing the rain to the plague, it describes and shows that it was very intense and it spread fast. The Price family cannot believe the amount of rain the congo is receiving. “The serene heavens above began to dump buckets”, although this is not actually true the imagery can make someone imagine the amount of rain falling from the sky.

Since the Price family lived in Georgia they had always thought that the amount of rain that Kilanga received would never occur. Adah says, “ A pestilence of rain we received, the likes of which we had never seen or dreamed about in Georgia.” In the same chapter Adah says that they would never have imagined the amount of rain that fell because they thought of the Congo as a very dry and sunny place. By using these metaphors the readers can imagine the type of rain Kilanga received.


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